25th October 2020

COATINGS REDUCE FROST FORMATION

Biphilic surface coatings are showing promise in reducing icing on metal surfaces. Initial research at Kansas State University has focused on delaying frost formation on aircraft wings in winter, but other applications will likely emerge.

With colleagues, Amy Betz, a professor in mechanical engineering at the university, has created a surface that can significantly delay frost formation, even at temperatures of down to 6 degrees Celsius below freezing. The surface is biphilic, meaning it repels water in some areas and attracts it in others.

Previous research by other groups has focused mainly on the frost-preventing properties of superhydrophobic surfaces. In general, the surfaces work by repelling water droplets before they have time to freeze. There is little research, however, on surfaces that mix hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas.

Betz had experience working with such biphilic surfaces for boiling experiments, and in 2012 she and her colleagues found that superhydrophilic surfaces with superhydrophobic hexaganol spots resulted in the most efficient transfer of heat during boiling, compared to surfaces with uniform wettability. She wondered how similar ‘split personality’ surfaces would affect ice formation.

Betz’ team created three different biphilic surface patterns. Each surface consisted of hydrophilic circles on a hydrophobic background. For two of the surfaces, the circles were 200 micrometers across, and either arranged in an even grid, like the dots on the 4-side of dice, or staggered, like the dots on the 5-side of dice. The third surface consisted of smaller, 25 micrometer-sized circles in an even grid. The researchers also made a purely hydrophobic surface and a purely hydrophilic surface.

The team tested the surfaces in a chamber at a range of set temperatures and humidities and waiting for three hours to see if frost formed. Ice crystals appeared at the warmest temperatures for the hydrophilic surface - at about 1-2 degrees Celsius below freezing. The hydrophobic surface decreased the temperature required for freezing in the three-hour time frame by about an additional 1 degree Celsius.

The biphilic surfaces had the most success. At 60 percent relative humidity, all three biphilic surfaces required temperatures around 6 degrees below freezing before ice would form in the three-hour window.

The researchers attribute the frost-busting properties to the unusual condensation and coalescence dynamics on the biphilic surfaces. Small droplets about 5 micrometers in diameter initially formed on both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas, Betz said, but as the droplets grew, they merged with other droplets, and became confined to the hydrophilic spots.

Each time a droplet merged with another droplet it released energy held by surface tension, because the surface area of the new droplet was smaller than the combined surface area of the two droplets prior to merging. The new droplet was also larger, which increased the energy removal needed to freeze it. Both factors delayed the freezing of the droplets, the researchers said.

scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/107/14/10.1063/1.4932050